Journalists and Alabama graduates share career advice

Senior journalism majors at The University of Alabama are quickly approaching graduation on Saturday. Some students have landed their dream jobs, while others are still searching on job engines and looking for post-graduate internships.
Journalists and students revealed useful tactics to gain a potential employers attention and be successful at their job. The May 2016 College of Communication and Information Sciences graduating class had 404 graduates. Two hundred forty-four students took part in a survey that reported that 69 percent had jobs upon graduating in their field.
Tasha Smith, program manager of career services at UA, works with students who are looking for careers after graduation, helps build resumes, cover letters and conduct mock interviews.
“There is a plethora of ways that students get their future jobs including internships, networking, crimson careers and on-campus job-fairs, which seem to be the most popular,” said Smith.
Charean Williams, a Texas A&M alumnus, has been covering the NFL for 23 seasons. Her position at the Fort Worth Star-Telegram requires her to build relationships with players and post daily updates to the website and her personal Twitter page. Williams was the first female Pro Football Hall of Fame writer and first female president for Pro Football Writers of America.
“Get to know players on a personal level rather than a professional only level. Talk to these guys about life, about what’s going on in the world, they love talking about basketball more than anything else in the world,” said Williams.
Steve Hennessey, the associate editor for Golf Digest in New York City has been with the publication since he graduated from Penn State University in 2011. His responsibilities include writing and editing for the magazine along with blog posts on Golf Digest and goldworld.com.
“The more experience you have the better. You’ll be more attractive to a potential employer. General journalism skills and being able to take videos and edit with software are most important,” said Hennessey.
Dan Wolken, the national college football reporter for USA Today graduated from Vanderbilt University in 2001. He was the editor-in-chief for the Vanderbilt Hustler, college basketball reporter for Memphis Commercial Appeal and national sports columnist for The Daily. Wolken is featured on sports radio talk shows and podcasts weekly while having an engaging Twitter fan-base.
“Internships outweigh your GPA in this industry. Experience is more important than a subpar GPA because that typically gets overlooked,” said Wolken.
Alli Cohen, a public relations graduate of the fall 2016 class, has had two internships since, with hopes of locking a job. Cohen was a public relations director at the Capstone Agency on campus for two years before landing an internship with Adult Swim in Atlanta that lasted three months’ post-graduation.
“I moved to Seattle two weeks ago for another internship and I’m hoping the company will hire me after,” said Cohen.
Taylor Neuman, a graduating senior earning her degree in telecommunications and film, has had seven internships throughout college. The internships did not lead to job offers, but they helped her create content for her reel as a reporter and learn from experiences to where she had everything she needed to apply for jobs.
“You really have to somehow make yourself stand out or else you won’t get hired. You also should make sure you have enough content to show to future employers on all spectrums so they can see what you’re capable of. It’s not easy but starting early is the best decision,” said Neuman.
Neuman received an offer from wvns 59 News in West Virginia as a reporter and multimedia journalist. She applied for the job on indeed.com with no connections to the news station. Neuman gave rising seniors a valuable piece of information for their application process.
“Reach out to everyone, make as many connections as possible. Sometimes it’s not what you know, it’s who you know. Someone you’ve met in your past that you kept in contact with may be the way into your future job,” said Neuman.

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Muslims on Campus

 

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The star and crescent symbol of Islam.

North Lake is a diverse multicultural community college. NLC is inclusive and helpful to make every student feel at home. But, what happened when Islamphobia hit the country?After 9-11 many people stereotyped all Muslims as terrorists. The nation started labeling Islam as a hate-based religion, this lack of knowledge or misinformation created an intolerant behavior among Americans.

Even recently some presidential candidates drag the attention of voters pointing out that ISIS is the representation of Islam and the root of evil. However, NLC’s inclusive atmosphere hasn’t been poisoned with hatred.

During the Fall 2015 semester NLC held the panel: “Islam: Myths and Facts.” The panel was a success getting student and faculty attention. After the panelists answered questions from the audience, Dr. Imam Zia, the author of Islam: Silencing the Critics said, “I would urge everyone in the future, if you really and truly want information about Islam, then interact and get involved with Muslims.”

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Also, NLC has a Muslim Student Association where Muslims and non-Muslims can interact and learn about Islam.

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Sadiya Patel is the President of the Muslim Students Association, and an officer of Alpha Zeta Eta the North Lake College’s chapter of Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society. Also, she is part of various clubs and organizations on campus. Photo by Alejandra Zavaleta Melara

The president of MSA, Sadiya Patel, is an example of dedication and hard work.

“My liberal side made me into an ambitious, goal-oriented feminist which combated many of the stereotypes.”

Patel is easily to recognize on campus as one of the only Muslim students that wears a Burka. Stills, a lot of people probably will think that wearing a Burka or a Hijab means oppression to women.

However, wearing a Burka or Hijab represents of modesty in her religion.

“I just grew closer to God on a spiritual level and felt like I could do more to maintain my modesty,” Patel said. “I felt that my beauty wasn’t meant for everyone’s eyes and that I could choose to be in control of my image and body.”

 

ISIS has claimed so many terrorist attacks in Europe, and with the civil war in Syria, people misassociated Islam with ISIS.

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Saida Elshantaf studying for finals at NLC library. Photo by Alejandra Zavaleta Melara

“Islam means peace, therefore we’re a religion that promotes peace. Just because a minority, which I would rather not call them Muslims, are promoting terror doesn’t mean that this idea applies to all Muslims,” said Saida Elshantaf, NLC student. “I respect all other religions, and I love to be in a place where I feel respected.”

Islam is a religion that actively encourage peace and tolerance, yet like in every other religion some people are extremist and have given bad reputation to the faith.

“Islam was never a religion of terror and hatred,” said Burhan Lokhandwala, NLC student. “We do not mean harm and all terrorists are not Muslims and they do not understand the real message of Islam anyways. We love everyone and we are a peaceful community.”